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Brand-new group getting lots of attention

Brand Name > Brand-new group getting lots of attention


“It could be a cute girl who plays pool pretty well,” one of the members of Sharkmuffin told a reporter in answer to a question about the band name that some think of as slang for naughty bits. Billboard magazine once included Sharkmuffin in their list of “20 All-Female Bands You Need to Know.” Here’s what the editors heard: a power-punk collection of original music that shows the three Sharkmuffins to be keen students of one of rock’s better eras: grunge. The tunes are guitar-heavy, very catchy, and spiked with insolence: “Twist the knife when you say only sometimes,” sings Tarra Thiessen in “Tampons Are for Sluts.” “It would sure be nice to be your everything for tonight/ But now the bar is closed/ And you’re making me go home.”



With three EPs released in 2013 and their full-length debut (Chartreuse) dropped only last year, Sharkmuffin is a brand-new group that has gotten much rock-industry attention. They are vox/drummer Kim Deuss, Natalie Kirch on bass and vocals, and powerhouse guitarist/vocalist Thiessen. They broke free of the heavy gravity of nightclub obscurity fast and hard; soon enough, hometown press was calling them the coolest band in Brooklyn.

The bulk of this band’s stuff is borderline primal-scream therapy about ex-boyfriends, about missed connections, drunken bed-wetting, the death of chivalry, and on and on. A listener could chalk this up to age and gender but, really, there’s nothing to complain about here. Blues men, for example, have been stacking similar gripes against the opposite sex in their songs for at least a century. But despite the Sharkmuffin band’s rich glaze of sometimes heady rock and roll, the experience is almost disposable. Nothing of their music sticks to a listener. Maybe it’s not supposed to. Well-played as it may be, the random fan is therefore free to graze, enjoy, and move on.

Big Bloom also performs.



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